Pathology

We provide diagnostic and prognostic tests and clinical opinions on almost all patients in hospital, outpatients and provides a service to over 180 GP practices, including:

  • Biochemistry including Endocrinology and Prenatal Screening
  • Cellular Pathology including Cytology, Histology and Mortuary
  • Haematology including Blood Transfusion and Immunology
  • Microbiology including Bacteriology, Virology and Mycology
  • Phlebotomy

Pathology services are provided from Queen's and King George Hospitals employing some 300 staff including biochemists, biomedical scientists, consultants, cytoscreeners, medical laboratory assistants, phlebotomists, secretarial and support staff.

The department carries out around 80,000 tests a day - that's about 24 million in a year!

Key telephone numbers

01708 435000 ext 8510

Key staff

Specialty Clinical Lead: Uche Igbokwe

General Manager: Len Kemp

Cellular pathology referral centres

Sending cases to an external pathologist for reporting or second opinion / referred cases Table 1: Referral Sites and Pathologists

Table 1: Referral Sites and Pathologists
Specialty Referral Name and address
Breast Pathology Professor Sarah Pinder, Chair in Breast Histopathology, St Thomas’ Hospital, Westminster Palace Road, Westminster SE1 7EH
Gynaecological Pathology Dr Naveena Singh, Department of Histopathology, Royal London Hospital, 80 Newark Street, London E1 2ES
Professor Glenn McCluggage, Department of Pathology, Royal Group of Hospitals NHS Trust, Grosvenor Road, Belfast BT12 6BF
Haematological Pathology Dr Maria Calaminici, Department of Histopathology, Royal London Hospital, 80 Newark Street, London E1 2ES
Bone/Soft Tissue Pathology Professor Adrienne Flanagan, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Brockley Hill, Stanmore, Middlesex HA7 4LP
Dr Fernanda Amary, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, Brockley Hill, Stanmore, Middlesex HA7 4LP
Respiratory Pathology Professor Andrew Nicholson, Department of Histopathology, Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney Street Wing, London SW3 6NP
Professor Mike Sheaff, Department of Histopathology, Royal London Hospital, 80 Newark Street, London. E1 2ES
Urological Pathology Dr D Berney, Department of Histopathology, Royal London Hospital, 80 Newark Street, London . E1 2ES
Head and Neck Pathology Dr Hannah Cottom , Department of Histopathology, Royal London Hospital, 80 Newark Street, London . E1 2ES
Skin Pathology Dr E Calonje, St John’s Institute of Dermatology, South Wing, Block 7, St Thomas’ Hospital, London SE1 7EH
Dr S Jeetle, Department of Histopathology, Royal London Hospital, 80 Newark Street, London
GI Pathology including BCSP Professor Marco Novelli. Consultant Histopathologist Department of Histopathology, 4th floor Rockerfeller Building, UCLH University Street, London WC1E 6JJ
Professor Neil Shepherd. Cellular Pathology, Cheltenham General Hospital, Sandford road, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, GL53 7AN
Endocrine Pathology Dr Derek Roskell, Department of Cellular Pathology, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford OX3 9DU
Paediatric Pathology Dr. Irene Scheimberg Department of Histopathology, Royal London Hospital, 80 Newark Street, London E1 2ES
Neuropathology Professor S Brandner/ /Dr Thom, Professor J Holton, Institute of Neurology, Queen’s Square, London WC1N 3BG

Cellular Pathology offers a comprehensive service to its users and patients however a number of investigations are referred to external centers if not performed on site. These investigations are listed in table 2.

Test Name Test Type Referral Site Name and Address Justification for referral
EGFR PCR UHB, Molecular Diagnostics, Mindelsohn Way, Birmingham B15 2TH For samples that do not contain greater than 10% tumour or are limited in size for in-house processing.
KRAS PCR Sarah Cannon Laboratories, Sarah Cannon Molecular Diagnostics, Ground Floor, Shropshire House, 1 Capper Street, London. WC1E 6JA For samples that do not contain greater than 10% tumour or are limited in size for in-house processing.
NRAS PCR Sarah Cannon Laboratories, Sarah Cannon Molecular Diagnostics, Ground Floor, Shropshire House, 1 Capper Street, London. WC1E 6JA For samples that do not contain greater than 10% tumour or are limited in size for in-house processing.
BRAF PCR Sarah Cannon Laboratories, Sarah Cannon Molecular Diagnostics, Ground Floor, Shropshire House, 1 Capper Street, London. WC1E 6JA For samples that do not contain greater than 10% tumour or are limited in size for in-house processing.
GIST PCR UHB, Molecular Diagnostics, Mindelsohn Way, Birmingham B15 2TH Test not performed in-house
PD-L1 - Triple negative Breast Ca. IHC UHB, Molecular Diagnostics, Mindelsohn Way, Birmingham B15 2TH Test not performed in-house
PD-L1 Urothelial Ca IHC UHB Test not performed in-house
HER2- Gastric Ca IHC Source Bioscience Test not performed in-house

24-hour urine collection

Why do I have to collect this sample?

Your doctor has requested the measurement of various substances in your urine. The best way to measure these is to use all the urine you have passed during a 24-hour period.

A large plastic urine collection bottle will be provided for this test. For some tests you may require two collection bottles.

Urine collection bottles can be collected from the Blood Tests department at Queen’s Hospital or the Pathology department, on the first floor of King George Hospital. Please do not use your own collection bottle.

Some urine bottles may contain liquid to preserve the substance that is being tested. Please do not discard this liquid, avoid skin contact and do not drink this liquid.

Do not urinate directly into the bottle. If you accidentally splash your skin or eyes with some of the liquid wash the area with lots of water. It may sting but should not cause harm.

For some tests a blood sample may also be required, which should be taken on the morning following the end of the 24-hour urine collection period.

24-hour urine bottle with liquid and a blood sample taken on the following day.

Type of samples required

Creatinine clearance

24 hour urine bottle and a blood sample taken on the following day.

Stone screen

Two 24 hour urine bottles (one bottle with liquid) - urine must be collected over two separate 24 hour periods.

Other test

24-hour urine bottle

What should I do before I start collecting my sample?

It may help if you find a clean funnel or jug that you can use to collect the urine and transfer it into the urine collection bottle provided by the hospital. Please do not use your own container. Choose a day when you are certain you will be able to collect all your urine; this will probably be a day when you are not likely to be going out for a long time.

How do I collect my sample?

  1. On the label of the urine collection bottle, fill in your full surname, full first name and date of birth.
  2. When you get up in the morning, for example 7.30am completely empty your bladder into the toilet (whether or not you feel the need). Fill in the start date and time on the bottle.
  3. From now on, every time you empty your bladder collect all the urine into the urine collection bottle. Remember to us a clean funnel or jug to make this easier.
  4. The next day, at the same time as you started, completely empty your bladder into the bottle (whether or not you feel the need). Fill in the finish date and time on the bottle.
  5. Repeat this if you need to collect two 24-hour urine samples.

What else do I need to know?

Eat and drink normally on the day of collection unless your doctor has told you otherwise. If possible, please keep your sample in a cool place, out of the sun and away from radiators.

Please avoid faecal contamination of the urine by emptying your bladder into the bottle before emptying your bowels.

Who do I tell if I have a problem?

If you accidentally pass any urine into the toilet instead of the bottle or if the bottle was not big enough you will need to start the test again and you will need to get a new urine collection bottle. The Blood Test department staff can give you a new bottle so you can repeat the collection.

What do I do with the sample when i have finished?

Make sure the lid is done up tightly. As soon as it is convenient to do so, within a day or so, bring the bottle(s) and the test request form to the blood test area at Queen’s Hospital or the Pathology department, first floor King George Hospital as soon as possible, between 8.30am and 4.30pm, Monday to Friday.

Please remember to have your blood test if required by your doctor.

How will I find out the results?

The results of the test will be sent back to the doctor who requested the test as soon as the analysis is complete. Depending on the tests being done this could be anything from several days to a few weeks.

Where can i get more information?

www.labtestsonline.org.uk is a website with information about hospital laboratories and laboratory tests.

If you have any further queries about why this test is being done, please speak to the doctor or consultant who requested the test.

Please follow these instructions carefully. Failure to do so will make it difficult for your doctor to interpret the results and you may have to do it again.

For any queries, please ring between 9am and 5pm:

King George Hospital Pathology department on 0208 970 8021

Queen’s Hospital Phlebotomy department on 01708 435 498

If you need help with communicating with us, please let us know. You can call us on 01708 435 454 / 020 8970 8234 or email bhrut.pals@nhs.net.

If you are deaf or unable to communicate with us using telephone or email, we have a text service which can be contacted on 07800 005 502.

 

Media browser

Total results: 13
Title Status Format Description Size Date Download
Biochemistry Critical limits Current Biochemistry Critical limits • Biochemistry Critical Limits, Turnaround Times, Reference Ranges, and Referred Out Work 391KB 24/09/20 Download
Biochemistry Reference Ranges Current Biochemistry Reference Ranges Biochemistry Reference Ranges 289KB 14/10/20 Download
Biochemistry Turnaround time Current Biochemistry Turnaround time Biochemistry Turnaround time 398KB 24/09/20 Download
Biochemistry-How to complete a Prenatal Screening request form 5431 Current Biochemistry-How to complete a Prenatal Screening request form 5431 Biochemistry-How to complete a Prenatal Screening request form 5431 318KB 30/07/21 Download
Blood Bottle list Current Blood Bottle list Blood Bottle list 551KB 24/09/20 Download
Cytology Turnaround times Current Cytology Turnaround times Cytology Turnaround times 451KB 24/09/20 Download
Haematology and Blood Transfusion Turnaround times Current Haematology and Blood Transfusion Turnaround times Haematology and Blood Transfusion Turnaround times 628KB 24/09/20 Download
Haematology Reference Ranges Current Haematology Reference Ranges Haematology Reference Ranges 93KB 24/09/20 Download
Haematology Referred Out Work Current Haematology Referred Out Work Haematology Referred Out Work 261KB 14/10/20 Download
Histology Turnaround times Current Histology Turnaround times Histology Turnaround times 179KB 24/09/20 Download
Immunology Turnaround time and Reference ranges Current Immunology Turnaround time and Reference ranges Immunology Turnaround time and Reference ranges 69KB 24/09/20 Download
Microbiology Inhouse and Referred out Turnaround times Current Microbiology Inhouse and Referred out Turnaround times Microbiology Inhouse and Referred out Turnaround times 91KB 24/09/20 Download
Non-Blood Bottle list Current Non-Blood Bottle list Non-Blood Bottle list 729KB 24/09/20 Download
Total results: 13

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